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Kids Born Via C-Section More Likely To Be Obese As Adults

12 Octobre 2017

RG: Why do you think mice born by Caesarian gained more weight? .

In a new study, researchers compared the weight gain and gut microbes of mice born by C-section to those born vaginally.

World Obesity Day: New study reveals that kids born via a c-section delivery are more likely to become obese adults. At that point, C-section mice had gained 33 percent more weight than those delivered naturally.

Maria Dominguez-Bello: There is evidence that C-section born infants have increased risk of obesity, type 1 diabetes, celiac diseases, allergies, and asthma, what we call the modern plagues.

Un astéroïde a frôlé la Terre ce jeudi matin
"Comme cela, le jour où arrivera un objet vraiment dangereux, nous aurons répété plusieurs fois avant", ajoute-t-il. L'astéroïde 2012 TC4, qui mesure entre 15 et 30 mètres passera jeudi entre la Terre et la Lune.

The study was conducted in the New York University. I recommend not to opt for a C-section when not medically necessary. In the US, C-sections account for 32 percent of births, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. By the time they were four weeks old, the C-section mice had lower levels of some bacterial species and more of others.

However, that of mice born by c-section, matured too quickly at first and then regressed later in their lives. Sex didn't seem to play as much of a role, as both male and female C-section mice had more Lactobacillus and Erysipelotrichaceae taxa and fewer Bacteroides, Ruminococcaceae, Lachnospiraceae, and Clostridiales, bacterial groups that have been shown to promote leaner bodies in previous studies of mice.

While the C-section mice are heavier, it isn't clear whether they are actually unhealthy. "We will be able to determine if the microbes restore normal development and find the related human microbes", Dominguez-Bello says. She studies the microbiome and preterm birth in humans, and notes that it is hard to say what the new results mean for people. No wonder women choose to have C-sections.

The microbiomes of the C-section mice also looked different to those born vaginally. One is that they did not use perinatal antibiotics, but the team expects that antibiotics, combined with C-section, could contribute to the weight gain.