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Manchester 'homeless hero' charged with stealing credit card from bomb victim

16 Août 2017

Patrycia Klis, 12, and her 20-year-old sister Alex will receive £500,000 between them after their parents - who were waiting to collect them from the concert - were both killed.

Twenty-two people died when suicide bomber Salman Abedi detonated a device as crowds left an Ariana Grande concert at the arena.

Each family has already had £70,000 and the remaining balance should be paid within weeks, fund organisers said yesterday.

Lisa and Andrew Roussos, mother and father of Saffie Rose Roussos, the youngest victim of the bombing of the Manchester Arena, leave her funeral at Manchester Cathedral, Britain, July 26, 2017.

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The charity, set up with money raised by Manchester City Council, the British Red Cross and Manchester Evening News aims to provide ongoing care for victims' physical and mental health, help with their financial needs and support affected families.

Trustees decide how and when to distribute the money, including making awards to those who have been seriously injured by the attack.

"We believe that the members of the public who generously donated to the We Love Manchester appeal want to see their money go directly to the victims". According to Sue Murphy, who is the chair of the fund, has said that there are still 9 people in the hospital who are recovering from the injuries they sustained during the horrific bombing.

Ms Murphy said a separate fund would be set up to pay for a memorial to the bomb victims.

Manchester 'homeless hero' charged with stealing credit card from bomb victim