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Principale » Judge orders FAA to consider whether seat size influences safety

Judge orders FAA to consider whether seat size influences safety

01 Août 2017

While on-board Wi-Fi and seat-back TVs may serve as a gimmicky distraction, it's impossible to ignore the uniquely terrible discomfort of an overbooked flight - or, quite honestly, to ignore the fact that it feels like the amount of personal space you get on a plane seems to be dwindling by the day.

Which can happily be translated as: Shoving more Economy seats into planes. Nearly all of them consist of a smaller legroom and additional seats. As a outcome, the incremental demand for plane tickets is met with uncomfortable conditions.

The FAA replied to the ruling: "We are studying the ruling carefully and any potential actions we may take to address the court's findings".

The court said the FAA had used "off-point" studies and "undisclosed tests using unknown parameters" to justify its initial refusal to review the rules.

"This is the Case of the Incredible Shrinking Airline Seat", Judge Patricia Ann Millett wrote on behalf of the three-judge panel.

"This is the Case of the Incredible Shrinking Airline Seat".

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A U.S. House of Representatives bill under consideration would require the FAA to set minimum seat sizes on U.S. airlines and a minimum distance between rows to "protect the safety and health of airline passengers".

Advocates argue that small airline seats can put passengers' health at risk like blood clots in the legs.

The legroom situation quickly took scandalous proportions when several national carriers announced additional seats per plane.

Airline seats were designed for people no taller than 5-foot-10, and in reasonably good shape, FlyersRights.org argued, noting that "many Americans do not fit into this category". These changes would allow increasing their clients per flight to the detriment of everyone's comfort.

Alas, none of this means the FAA has to make seats any bigger. However, the court made a reference to this weak alibi stating that it would no longer tolerate such shaky records. It insisted that sitting in Economy wasn't just painful, but a safety hazard.

Judge orders FAA to consider whether seat size influences safety