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The questions that could determine Sessions' fate

13 Juin 2017

"My inclination is that this should be in an open session", he said on CBS "This Morning."

On Comey's accusations that Trump pressed him to drop the FBI investigation of his former national security adviser, Michael Flynn, Bharara said "no one knows right now whether there is a provable case of obstruction" of justice.

Sessions is skipping a separate hearing on Tuesday on the Justice Department's budget and sending his deputy for the session that will be open to the public.

But officials said Sessions's relationship with Trump has been strained since the attorney general recused himself from the Russian Federation probe in March.

Following Comey's public testimony last Thursday, he told senators in a closed hearing that afternoon that Sessions may have had a third interaction with Russia's ambassador to the USA, according to people familiar with the briefing.

Senator Ron Wyden of OR, a Democrat who also sits on that panel, said the American public had the right to hear the attorney general's answers.

CNN reported last week that former FBI Director James Comey told senators in a closed session that Sessions might have met with Kislyak a third time.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is preparing to face former Senate colleagues over his role in the controversy around ties between the Trump campaign and Russian Federation.

Comey's dramatic testimony drew invective from his former boss on Twitter, with Trump dismissing him as a leaker on Friday and a coward on Sunday. As he did so, he defended himself against allegations of improper contacts, saying, "Let me be clear: I never had meetings with Russian operatives or Russian intermediaries about the Trump campaign".

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It cited the president's campaign statements calling for a "total and complete shutdown" on Muslims entering the U.S. Hawaii Attorney Doug Chin tells reporters Monday he's "more cautiously optimistic" that the decision by the 9th U.S.

It later came out in closed session questioning that Sessions had yet another meeting with Russian ambassador to the US and purported spymaster Sergey Kislyak.

On Tuesday, Sessions will have the chance to give his own answer in person - or explain to senators what other conversations he and Trump may have had on this subject about which Comey might not have been aware.

"There are many unanswered and troubling questions, so the attorney general needs to be forthcoming", said Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.). What ex-FBI Director Comey said Trump said and did to him didn't reflect well on Trump's judgment or his ability to tell the truth, to say the least. A move the White House hasn't ruled out.

And both the Senate and House committees will hold closed meetings this week - the Senate on Tuesday and Thursday and the House on Wednesday and Thursday.

More than four decades ago, the Senate voted to create a special investigative committee to look into the Watergate break-in, and Archibald Cox, the Watergate special prosecutor, subpoenaed the White House tapes from Nixon. The fact that Sessions would delegate that task showed the Russian Federation investigation was distracting him from his core duties.

The hearing will bring contentious questioning for Sessions and likely some uncomfortable moments for the Trump administration.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren's fraught history with now-Attorney General Jeff Sessions is no secret. "And that's very disturbing and, as you know, the president has sort of denigrated this whole idea from the very beginning", he said.

Leahy and Al Franken have raised questions about whether Sessions testified falsely to them earlier this year about his Russian Federation connections. If President Donald Trump is also keeping recordings of his conversations, any controversy over those will have begun with a tweet.