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Trump calls UK Prime Minister May after election upset

10 Juin 2017

Financial markets dislike uncertainty but were handed a hugely clouded outlook Friday after the Conservative party of Prime Minister Theresa May lost its parliamentary majority in Britain's snap general election.

"What the country needs more than ever is certainty", the Conservative leader said, as a political crisis brewed around her. All of this will certainly make Brexit negotiations more complex.

In the immediate aftermath of the results, the Labour Party, more particularly its leader Jeremy Corbyn, has been baying for her resignation but she is determined to continue.

The DUP, which increased its number of seats to 10, said it was working on a deal with the Tories whereby it would support them on a vote-by-vote basis. May confirmed Friday that senior ministers would remain in their posts, despite rumours that she had been ready to sack finance minister Philip Hammond following a clash over her Brexit strategy.

After a meeting with Britain's Queen Elizabeth, May promised to keep pushing forward to "fulfill the promise of Brexit". But meanwhile talk of a heave was already filtering through senior MPs in the Conservative party.

"We don't know when Brexit talks start", Tusk tweeted.

European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker said he hoped there would be no further delay to the negotiations.

They said it could harm the Brexit talks, which are to begin in 10 days.

In the short span that Theresa May was at the helm after her predecessor David Cameron had quit office taking responsibility for the adverse European Union membership vote, there were terror incidents that shook Britain and worsened the security environment.

"They really only know one way to operate and that's to have enemies and I'm sure I'm one of those this morning". "Do your best to avoid a "no deal" as result of "no negotiations".

European Union budget commissioner Guenther Oettinger, meanwhile, warned that Mrs May was now likely to be a "weak" negotiating partner, which could also be bad for Europe.

"The British need to negotiate their exit but with a weak negotiating partner, there is a danger that the talks are bad for both parties", he told German radio.

With the DUP providing the Conservatives a narrow, but crucial, majority in Parliament, it could have an outsized influence.

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But she came under fire for a lacklustre, soundbite-driven performance on the campaign trail and a damaging U-turn on healthcare policy.

He now says he would return to the shadow cabinet if asked after being re-elected in Streatham, south London.

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, riding a wave of acclaim for his party's unexpectedly strong showing, called on May to resign.

So I think given the fact that Theresa May no longer has a majority and that her hard Brexit was rejected by the voters, I think things are going to get a lot more complicated in this Parliament.

PARKER: It's a really unusual one because it wasn't just the opinion polls.

Katie Perrior, who quit as May's communications chief in April, said Timothy and Hill were "great street fighters but poor political leaders" and exercised too much power over the prime minister.

"Mayhem" screamed the headline on the front page of The Sun, Britain's biggest selling newspaper, which normally backs the Conservatives.

The Conservatives won 318 seats in Thursday's vote, down from 331 in the 2015 vote, falling short of an overall majority in the 650-seat House of Commons. But Corbyn's party won many new seats Thursday.

For instance, Menon said, some pro-EU Conservative legislators may wait until the Brexit legislative program comes to Parliament to start attacking it.

May did not need to call for a new election.

The other politician who should be chastened by the election result is Nicola Sturgeon, whose hubristic call for a second independence referendum was nearly as disastrous as Ms May's decision to call a snap vote.

Now that Mrs May has reclaimed the prime ministership, however tenuously, the question becomes: what can she do with her limited mandate? He invited her to visit France at the earliest opportunity.