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Governor Mark Dayton signs Real ID measure into law

19 Mai 2017

As the Minnesota legislative session winds down to its final hours, Governor Mark Dayton and leaders in the House and Senate have been trying to come to agreement on the 10 spending bills passed by the Republicans who control the Legislature and the DFL governor who vetoed each and every one of them. But in the end, a compromise brought almost every lawmaker and the governor on board.

With it, Minnesotans will no longer have to worry about their driver's licenses not working for domestic flights.

Dayton praised the Legislature for finally passing what he called critical legislation.

Minnesota lawmakers have reached a deal to get the state in compliance with the federal REAL ID law.

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After that point, Minnesotans will have options: a Real ID license that will allow for access to airports, military facilities and federal buildings, or a standard license, which won't be valid for air travel or entrance to military or federal buildings.

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The votes, 120-11 in the House and 57-8 in the Senate, came Wednesday to help end the saga of bringing Real ID to the state. It took the House about six minutes to debate and approve the measure. The new law would require the Minnesota Department of Public Safety to begin issuing licenses by October 1, 2018.

This will also allow people with Real ID's to enter military bases.

The federal government offered other states extensions up to 2020 if they made moves to comply.

Immigration activists say they plan on fighting for driver's licenses for undocumented immigrants.

But even before the debate over immigrant identification, Minnesota lawmakers had a problem with the Real ID Act.

Governor Mark Dayton signs Real ID measure into law